Air ionizers vs monitor screens and TVs

This is strictly anecdotal, but I’ve been tracking this suspicion in my own environments for 10 years now, and I’m at least confident enough in it to post it here:

Air ionizers will screw up your LED monitors and televisions. 

This is one of those “theoretically it shouldn’t happen”… “but it does” things. Ionizers charge microscopic dust particles, and those are, in turn, attracted to other charged surfaces.

The problem is this: after about a year or 18 months in a room with an ionizer, a monitor/TV will start showing faint dirty-looking streaks, which will not wash off.  Why not? Because, near as I can tell, they are deposited between the protective facing and the actual LED panel itself. You simply cannot get to them.

They are easiest to see on a flat, light grey background, although with televisions, you may begin to notice them along the left or right-hand side of the screen, when there is a similarly modest and even tone present.

Isn’t the facing laminated to the LEDs? Nope. 

Well, isn’t it sealed?  You’d sure think so, eh?  But apparently not completely.

It’s too bad, because I like an ionizer running, but thru 6 or 7 monitors and 3 TVs over 10 years and 3 different ionizers, if I leave the ionizer on, then 100% of the time, in a year or so, the screen shows these effects. If I don’t run the ionizer, the 100% of the time, there is no effect to be seen.

So, if you’re seeing those faint but annoying steaks (or sometimes a pattern) then 1) you have my condolences, since even the manufacturer has no solution, but 2) now you know what might work: turn off the ionizer to keep it from getting any worse.

And 3) save your nickels an dimes for a new monitor…  

hth

Basic DNSResolver dropping message because it doesn’t match the one sent Port:0 – my fix

I have lots of probably horrible habits, but one is dropping into the Console to look at the system log every now and then.

A few days ago I did so, for the first time in weeks, to find literally tens of thousands of these:

Nov 8 12:33:42 myQuad.local discoveryd[56]: Basic DNSResolver dropping message because it doesn’t match the one sent Port:0 MsgID:13367
Nov 8 12:33:42 myQuad.local discoveryd[56]: Basic DNSResolver dropping message because it doesn’t match the one sent Port:0 MsgID:14649
Nov 8 12:33:42 myQuad.local discoveryd[56]: Basic DNSResolver dropping message because it doesn’t match the one sent Port:0 MsgID:12295
Nov 8 12:33:42 myQuad.local discoveryd[56]: Basic DNSResolver dropping message because it doesn’t match the one sent Port:0 MsgID:28005

That, in turn, lead to a search of the web, where it seems to be not completely uncommon. And LOTS of things to try to fix it. I tried a few, and in the process corrupted my drive, leading to dozens of hours of testing, repair, re-installs, more research and so on .

Port zero is a “non-port” sometimes used to get the OS to seach for and supply a free port. What that tells me is that whatever was causing these entries was local. My Synology? My network tools like PeakHour, iStat or LittleSnitch? Nope. Flushing cache? rebooting? Load/unload DNSResolver… ?

Absolutely nothing I could do would stop these mysterious messages.

Then this morning I found it.

I turned off “Back to my Mac” in iCloud preferences, and the messages, after weeks, finally stopped. (Yes, a few weeks ago, I turned in on for the first time… and then forgot about it.)

I could speculate, but frankly I’m too relieved to bother.

Just FYI.

Tracy
www.valleau.gallery